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    Cookaroo and GullyFood are the latest entrants in the vibrant foodscape of the city

    When it comes to innovation, one has got to hand it to the food business in India, and especially those on the online platform. Take for example, the two new ventures — Cookaroo, and GullyFood. While the former is quite close to what Swiggy does, the latter is giving you access to some of the most popular, and unknown street food joints in the city.
    Just like homeFoodAnchor3
    A few restaurants in the city have taken the concept of ‘co-working’ to another level. Credits to Cookaroo, founded by IIM-Indore graduates Darshan Subhash, Nikhil Karanjkar, and Eraj Hasan. Restaurants, such as Roomali on Church Street, are now sharing their kitchen, and even their chefs to cook food for you. And the Cookaroo team promises to deliver it to you in 45 minutes.
    Repeated failure of startups delivering home food led to the idea. Subhash explains the model, “The difference between our venture, and others in the same space is that we haven’t opened our own kitchens because setting up one in every locality will increase our costs. Instead, we have tied up with seven restaurants that let us use their kitchen, and chefs during non-rush hours. These outlets are mostly free during the weekdays, so it made sense to leverage their under-utilised resources.”
    Talking about keeping the menu quite close to what one would eat at home, Subhash says, “The food at restaurants is usually rich, and that is not something one would want every day, even if it’s priced at just `80 for a dish. So we’ve designed our own menu, and recipes that are simple, and wholesome.” You can either order a thali, or anything else you fancy. The menu is refreshed every day, and features 10-12 dishes, from chapatis, rice, sabzis, daal, to desserts.
    Rs 120 upwards. For lunch, and dinner. Available on Android. Details: cookaroo.com
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    With GullyFood, Chaitra Bharadwaj, and her cousin Gaurav Ranebennur are listing out the oldest, and best street food haunts across Bengaluru. A few upcoming addas also feature on its 180-plus long list, which has been drawn up from reviews, and recommendations by families, friends, and food fanatics. The venture has also done a round-up of street food specials in Hubballi, Lucknow, and Delhi.
    The option to find an address of a street food joint by keying in chaat, pani puri, or vadas into the search box is way more convenient than looking up the menu of an eatery one by one. You can also search area-wise. From compiling the timing, must-haves, to parking options around the eatery, the app is quite user-friendly. You will also find spicy dishes, juices, and desserts spelled out under three categories. What also caught our attention on this Android app is the little trivia, and back story about the eateries. So it is heartwarming to read the story of Shivanna Pani Puri; the stall at Jayanagar is so famous for its masala puri, and pani puri that director Pavan Kumar of Lucia fame made a documentary on it. Or, the story of Karnataka Bhel House in Chamarajpet that has been serving lip-smacking chaat since 1975.
    Scanning the city streets for her first entrepreneurial venture has thrown up interesting findings. Bharadwaj, a former chartered accountant, shares, “If you are craving momos, you should head to Koramangala. For the best gobi manchurian, head to VV Puram. If you want Arabian food, Kamanahalli is the place. And for everything South Indian, drive down to Malleswaram, Jayanagar, or JP Nagar. We found a stall in Malleswaram that sells chaat for diabetic people, made of fresh vegetables, sprouts, and pulses.” You can also leave your reviews about the stalls you’ve visited. Details: gullyfood.com

    — Barkha Kumari

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