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    Celebrity chefs take stock of the flavour of the season, while local hot spots share their plans for August

    Simple, fresh and light, but with an interesting depth of flavour—which it owes to indigenous ingredients and the influence of Portuguese and West African culinary traditions—is what marks Brazil’s food. Manish Mehrotra, executive chef, Indian Accent, calls it a country that loves its meats, as proven by the numerous churrascarias (barbecue houses) that dot the country. “Large cuts barbecued on sword-like skewers, it’s a meat lover’s paradise,” he says, recalling many a meal at various local addresses on his last visit to Rio. For others, the tropical flavours stand out. “A side of Brazilian cooking that I enjoy is their inclusion of fruits and fruit juice, even in the meats. They also use coconut milk and coconut water, which is reminiscent of our coastal cooking, minus the heavy spices,” says Aditya Bal, celebrity chef and host of NDTV Good Times’ food show, Chakh Le India. While we may not be too familiar with the cuisine in India, keeping the Summer Olympics in mind, we thought we’d ask a few chefs about their favourites.

    Ranveer BrarRanveer Brar
    “It’s been a while since I’ve visited Rio (went there last in 2010), but the flavours are still fresh in my mind. Though it is the land of the barbecue, the other foods are delicious and quite exotic. I love the acarajé—patties made of black-eyed peas purée, which are deep-fried and then stuffed with dried shrimp. Cachaça or fermented sugarcane juice (an integral element in the cocktail, caipirinha) is also a favourite,” says the chef, who has recently come out with his first cookbook, Come into my Kitchen. Having worked in the US too, he says he’s tried to incorporate a few ingredients into his cooking. Like Brazilian beef jerky. “I make wafers out of it, rehydrate it and make a mousse, or even chop it and add it to sausages. I use açaí nuts as a garnish on my baked yogurts and parfaits. And I love their salted cod. I make a chutney with it and serve it with a moong dal risotto and pan-seared scallops.”

    Must try: The Moqueca or the fish stew. The way it’s served, coming to the table piping hot in a clay pot, is memorable. The flavours are very Mediterranean.

    Chef Manish MehrotraManish Mehrotra

    “I went to Brazil four years ago and I love the concept of the Brazilian churrascaria. They roast full joints and the barbecued meats (beef, pork, lamb, ham and more) are brought to the table and carved in front of you. They are so fresh and succulent. There is also a buffet with accompaniments like salads, beans and stews. I would love to bring that concept down here, but do it in a more Indian way,” says the Delhi-based chef, who is known for his modern Indian cuisine. “I also use the Brazilian pink peppercorns (quite sweet in taste) extensively at my restaurants. In fact, our pink peppercorn raita is quite popular.”

    Must try: The picanha (rump cap), seasoned with no more than some coarse salt, and barbecued over charcoal.

    Aditya BalAditya Bal

    The celebrity chef might not have visited Rio or cooked as much Brazilian food as he would like to, but he hopes to change that soon. “I use a lot of their tropical peppers, like malagueta, and I have tried to do a churrasco-style while I worked in Goa. But to do an authentic barbecue like that you need beef and that’s a problem in India,” says the chef, who is currently working on opening a restaurant in Delhi. Stressing how he enjoys the Brazilian way of adding fruits to a dish, he says, “I do something similar by using fruit juices like passion fruit, orange or mango to flavour my dishes, instead of wine or stock. They bring a lovely, fresh acidity to the dish. I want to experiment with cachaça, jaggery and exotic fruits like açaí, carambola and cupuaçu.”

    Must try: The caipirinha. The national drink, it packs a punch with cachaça, sugar and lime.

    The Park
    Brazil prides itself on its meat. Naturally their churrascarias are one of the most finely made dishes on the menu. This meat barbecue is now available at 601 at The Park for all those who have a penchant for South American flavours. Sit back and relax as the Olympics unfold with some Brazilian-inspired cocktails at the Leather Bar as they bring out a special array of beverages for the tournament. Rs  550 onwards, from August 5.  Details: 42676000

    Taj Coromandel
    Celebrating the Brazilian spirit, Chipstead at Taj Coromandel is introducing a rum-based Rio 16 cocktail. Carrying tinges of blue, orange and yellow, the drink will reflect the colours of the games this year. Complete your meal with this off-beat cocktail when cheering your favourites. Rs 600. Details: 66002827

    Crowne Plaza
    Sip on some South American classics, as you watch countries go for glory, with cocktails like the Coffee Colada and Basil Mojito in Crowne Plaza’s cocktail range for the Rio Olympics. Watch out for their exclusive Rings of Glory variety, comprising of five signature cocktails like the Red rimmed martini, green rimmed mojito and others (resembling the five Olympic rings). Rs 400 onwards. Details: 24994101

    Sudaka
    The season is about celebrating Brazilian colour and flavour. Naturally,  the South American restobar, Sudaka is all set to impress. Ring in the Olympics with some classic Brazilian flavours like their Feijoada Classic special dish this season. This cooked black bean staple is available in vegetarian, pork and seafood variants, promising to bring the nation’s best flavours to our city.  Complete your meal with a Caipi Olympic Night cocktail, their take on the Caipirinha. Rs 595 (main course) Rs 495 (cocktail). Details: 30205522

    ITC Grand Chola
    At the ITC Grand Chola, while the caipirinha is on the menu—with the mango and passion fruit versions finding fans already—food and beverage manager Shaariq Akhtar says there are more specials coming up. “Our Guava and Ancho Chili Cocktail will be a fun sip. Sweet and spicy, it can even be frozen, like a nice sorbet. We also have Paulista (named after Sao Paulo) which is cachaça, muddled oranges and berries, topped with port.” Other specials include the Coffee Cachaca Shake—an adult milkshake, if you please, with two shots of espresso/filtered Brazilian coffee with cachaça and condensed milk. “You must try our take on the caipirinha, like the caiprioshka (vodka replaces the cachaça) and the sakerinha (sake takes over from cachaça). The latter is actually becoming popular in Brazil now,” he signs off. Rs 695 onwards. Details: 22200000

    Text: Surya Praphulla Kumar

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