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    Five musicians will present different genres of music, all in one night, at Madras Maalai II

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    By now, Sara Natasha knows that an event for music and food is bound to be a hit in the city. After all, Full House Entertainment’s Madras Market, at Wesley Grounds last year, saw around 20 stalls and a hit performance by singer Karthik. This year, Madras Maalai II—Taal, the Rhythms of India, sees performances by musicians like Rajesh Vaidhya, Naveen Kumar, Arun Kumar, Stephen Devassy and Josy John. “Sir Mutha Venkatasubba Rao Concert Hall can accommodate around 1,000 people and so we are expecting that many,” says Uththara Sridharan, the director of Full House Entertainment. There will be four stalls, with Cafe Adoniya  selling their kati rolls, burgers and cupcakes alongside beverage stalls. How did they choose the musicians? “We wanted to try something different, so we made the performance instrumental. All the artistes have previously worked with musicians like Ilayaraja and A R Rahman, and they will bring a good mix of music. In our events, food plays an integral  part, but we also want the audience to enjoy a good musical evening,” says Sridharan.
    Bridging the gap
    According to Vaidhya, who plays the veena, the evening will see fans of all five artistes. “The entire event will be a mix of Western and traditional music. I will be bringing in the classical aspect. Expect songs like Kodai Kaala Katre by Ilayaraja and some melodies by A R Rahman,” says the musician, who also tells us about his new instrument that he has nicknamed Ravana. “It sounds like a veena but looks like a guitar,” he says. Meanwhile, Devassy, a pianist and composer, tells us that he will straddle the Western and classical genres. “I will be the link and I will merge the two. Sometimes people appreciate complex tunes and sometimes they just like simple film music. You can expect both at the concert,” he adds.

    A new sound

    The music will encompass all the genres, yet will be different from fusion music, Devassy promises, adding that in the past few years, Chennai has opened up and now enjoys instrumental music, too. “The South is basically into classical music. But, thankfully, audiences have now opened up to jazz, blues and punk,” he concludes.

     

     

     

    At Sir Mutha Venkatasubba Rao Concert Hall, on September 28, from 6 pm onwards. Tickets are priced from `500. Details: bookmyshow.in
    —Mrinalini Sundar

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