Home Hyderabad Connecting the dots

0 497

Homegrown artists are making the city fall in love with new and experimental art forms

Young artists, who you may mistake for collegians, have taken over the city’s artscapes to paint it in brand new hues. Be it beautifying the city with street art or bringing together installations for a social cause, they are using every means to get art into people’s hearts.

Dia Mehta Bhupal
Artist and photographer
Her tryst with art is as old as her love for photography. This glamorous
artist weaves magic in breathtaking installations that transform commodities of daily life into objets d’art. Take a look at her art installations and you get to see the insides of an aeroplane with an aisle dividing blue chairs. An alumnus of Parsons School of Design, New York and Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, London, Bhupal has cultivated a penchant for photography. A lot of her artworks are made from waste paper. For a project of St+Art India Foundation, she was asked to give an artistic touch to 15 hoardings near Punjagutta flyover to de-clutter the visual pollution in ‘privatised’ public spaces. She’s going places this year. Her participation at the Yinchuan Biennale, For an ‘Image Faster that Light’ at The Museum of Contemporary Art was quite an achievement. Bhupal is participating at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale 2016 in December. She defines herself in three words, “Contemplative. Compassionate. Curious.”

Afza Tamkanat
Photo realism exponent
1aAt 26, this artist has a lot to offer to the art world. Afza’s work is rooted in issues of femininity – as reflected in her autobiographical series, her choice of pastel shades and themes such as of sparrows twittering on her canvasses. She was part of the Dubai Art Festival and will be travelling to this dream city again in March, 2017. Ask her about a day spent in her studio and she says, “Since I work on my canvases with a lot of coffee and use salt for texture, my studio looks like a tiny kitchen with jars and cans strewn around.” This Devi Award winner is focusing more on day-to-day experiences and people for her artworks in the time to come. “I take a deep look at common objects, be it bananas being sold on the roadside or the milkman’s jingling milk-pots. I’d like to include such themes in my artworks,” says the artist who holds an MA in Fine Arts from JNAFAU.

Priyanka Aelay
Figurative artist
Doe-eyed, with flowing long black hair, this artist conveys a lot of power in her artworks. Recently, she floored art lovers with an evocative art-performance – ‘I am Will,’ held in the city. It was packed with much action that blended well with her installations. Aelay, in her mid-20s, works long hours in her Somajiguda studio along with her father, artist Laxman Aelay. Her artworks focus on social issues taking metaphorical forms in the shape of flora and fauna. She focuses on autobiographical elements in her opuses. She’s planning a show of sculptures the next year. “Along with that I am also planning an art-performance.” Priyanka was part of the prestigious Street Art Festival held recently in the city.

Lakshmi Nambiar
3aShrishti Art Gallery
Originally an investment banker who studied at Boston University, Nambiar is flamboyant when it comes to handling one of the oldest galleries in the city – Shrishti. After her mother Ramani Nambiar passed away, she took charge of the space and organised the second edition of the Ramaniyam festival, held at the forsaken heritage structure Hill Fort Palace at Basheer Bagh. “I wanted to evoke sensibilities for art in people. Around 3,000 people appeared for the show. I see it as my growth, my achievement,” says the gallerist in her 30s. Ask her what’s on her wish-list and she replies, “I want people in the city to come on their own and appreciate art.” And what are her plans for the next year? Lakshmi shares, “Now, our annual memorial event Ramaniyam will happen once every two years. I am waiting eagerly for 2017 to make it more elaborate.”

Text: Saima Afreen

 

SIMILAR ARTICLES

0 567

0 628