Home Archives 2016 October 13

Daily Archives: Oct 13, 2016

Achiever 150, the latest motorcyclefrom the Hero stables, aims for thepremium slot commuter segment and ticks all the right boxes

FINE-TUNED at Hero’sCIT facility in Jaipur,the Achiever 150 isaimed at establishingHero in the premiumcommuter segmentand preparing the market formore exciting products. It is neatlyput together, with no-nonsensestyling and subtle cues to indicateits pedigree. Elements such as the carbon fibre-like finish on the instrument cluster, the 3-D ‘Hero’ logo on the tank, and five-spoke alloys add flair to the bike. Disc brakes are standard on the topend variant and the sleek body styling is most evident from a three-quarter angle. A lot of attentioN has also gone into the fit and finish, without any materials looking flimsy or out of place. Because it’s a commuter, the styling is minimalistic. The skinny 80/100-18 Ceat Secura tyre, however, could have been made chunkier at the rear for a sportier appeal. The upright riding position is extremely comfortable, even for tall riders, and two people can easily manage city commutes on the long, wide seat.

Engine study
Powering the Achiever 150 is a 149.1cc air-cooled engine, carried over from Hero’s JV with Honda, tuned to churn out 13.6PS a t 8 , 0 0 0 r pm a n d 12.8Nm of torque at 5,000rpm. It is also optimised to offer more linear power delivery. On firing up the bike with the electric start, the entire s e q u e n c e f e l t smooth. Slotting it into first gear and setting off on the test track, the refined engine characteristics were immediately apparent. I didn’t feel any harshness and the vibrations were quite reduced. Making my way through the gears, I realised how easy it was to ride. It can hold low speeds in higher gears without the engine sputtering and can accelerate from 0-60 kmph in five seconds (as claimed).

Future looks
The Achiever is the first 150cc to get Hero’s i3S (Idle Start-Stop System), which automatically shuts off the engine if the bike idles for more than five seconds in neutral. But a quick pull on the clutch will fire the engine back up. The bike returns a healthy 50 kmpl (based on the World Motorcycle Emission Test Cycle and not the Indian test cycle). The Achiever, carrying a f ive-year engine wa r r a n t y, a l s o comes with an ‘automatic headlight on’ (AHO) function, which activates the headlight the moment the engine is fired up—a feature that will soon become a standard in all two-wheelers.

Rs 61,800 (ex-showroom,Mumbai). Details: heromotocorp.com
—Vikram Gour @VikramGour

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Jaguar Racing bringson board ananimated Japanesemusician as brand ambassador

JAGUAR has just released a video featuring Noodle—from the bandGorillaz—behind the wheel of the I-Type 1, its entry car to the
Formula E this year. With her helmet donning a wide, toothy grin, Noodle swerves and corners the electric race car over a few good laps before stepping out of the cockpit and giving some handy tips to the engineers. Jaguar picked her for their campaign to inspire youngsters to develop a passion for innovation and engineering. The I-Type 1, in its dramatic fluorescent blue and black livery, marks the marque’s return to racing after a 12-year hiatus.The electric race car has been developed by Jaguar Racing with electronics and auto technology developed in collaboration with title sponsors, Panasonic. Team drivers will include GP2, IndyCar and WEC racer Adam Carroll, GP3 champion Mitch Evans and Ho-Pin Tung who also comes with prior Formula E experience.

Inspiring awe 

“Formula E can be a once-in-ageneration opportunity to inspire future generations of engineers—
a global platform to inspire and attract young children to a career in innovation. With the Jaguar Racing and Noodle partnership, we hope to inspire millions of young people to help invent thefuture,” says Fiona Pargeter, global PR communications director, Jaguar Land Rover. It also released a statement from Noodle saying, “The young minds of today are the engineers of tomorrow. We are in the driving seat and our imaginations are the fuel. It’s time to lead the charge and build a better world.”
Details: jaguar.in/jaguar-racing
—Agrima Joshua
@agrimonious

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    Mirzya
    Director: Rakeysh
    Omprakash Mehra
    Cast: Harshvardhan
    Kapoor, Saiyami Kher
    This celluloid drama brings to
    life the tragic love story of
    Mirza-Sahiban from Punjabi folklore. Newcomers, Harshvardhan Kapoor and Saiyami Kher play the lead roles in this aesthetically shot film that captures the locales brilliantly. Though it’s a film from master
    director, Mehra, the performances by the debutants could have been better.
    — TI

    Miss Perigrine’s Home
    For Peculiar Children
    Director: Tim Burton
    Cast: Eva Green, Asa Butterfield
    Based on the novel of the same name, this film set in a magical kingdom, follows teenager Jake (Butterfield) who must save his new friends from dangerous enemies. While the film has much to admire, it doesn’t feel like a true Tim Burton film. — Team Indulge

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      Bengaluru is a coffee-loving city, sure. But how much do people know about what’s in their cup? How much does the way it’s made impact its taste?
      I spent an afternoon learning all this with Tapaswini Purnesh, a marketing head (fifth generation of her family in the coffee business) and a diploma holder from Le Cordon Bleu. In the cosy coffee-tasting room of their bright airy office, I was led through the making of three types of coffee with their quality specialist Shruti – the pourover, the popular French press and the zippy aeropress. The same coffee made via different methods yields distinctly different body and intensity. Their coffee estates in Chikmagalur’s Bababudan hills grows quality robusta (a strong bean giving creaminess and a fuller mouthfeel), as well as Arabica (known for its sweetness and acidity). The Classic Group’s robusta has been winning awards internationally at coffee fairs for years. Indeed, according to Tapaswini, “Indian robusta is one of the best in the world.” The family has a long-established wine retail business, and Tapaswini’s father, DM Purnesh points out the similarities between wine and coffee. “Many terms are similar; mouthfeel, aroma, body, acidity, aftertaste. We call acidity ‘brightness’ here, but it’s the same thing.”
      I watch the precise timing and delicate handling of the pourover method. “It’s a calming, slow process,” says Tapaswini. “Being light-bodied, it’s an ideal after-lunch beverage: put on some music and brew yourself a cup.” Pourovers are doing big business in trendy bars and gourmet cafes worldwide where their charm and delicacy have caught on.
      Are people savvier today about their coffee or does instant still rule the roost, I ask her. “For generations, we’ve drunk coffee a certain way, but few question where it’s from and how it’s made. Young people certainly know what they want and are ready to try coffee in its purest form, sans milk or sugar. It’s a great starting point.”
      The meticulously made French press coffee is poured. Already, the aromas wafting upwards are stronger, the body fuller and darker: an ideal pick-me-up after a long day. Finally, she demonstrates the zippy aeropress, very new age in its look and feel. But its deep richness with its lush crema is a delight to the senses.
      Classic, like many other local coffee growers, exports 90 per cent of its production, mostly to premium micro roasters in Europe and America. They are now looking to grow within India and its young generation of coffee drinkers. For starters, Tapaswini, who loves a good double espresso herself, plans to hold coffee brewing and tasting sessions to help educate and draw coffee fans into the fold. Her background in culinary learning helps her understand flavour profiles. A bonus: she does dessert pairings with coffee, too.
      “People think it’s easier to make tea, but coffee has its own charm. The day of the coffee soirée isn’t far – call some friends home, brew good coffee and make it the centre of the conversation.”

      -Ruma Singh

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        Citizengage converts waste to a valuable resource

        A few weeks ago, Freedom Park was lit up with energy created from a biogas plant which was fed waste from restaurants around Bengaluru. The folks behind this feat were Citizengage, an end-to-end waste management start-up, which is making a positive change in terms of the garbage situation in the city.

        It’s no secret that Bengaluru has a garbage problem. The organisation collects segregated waste from restaurants and apartment complexes and distributes it to biogas plants and recycling centres. “We noticed that there was a problem at both ends,” says Ashish Malayil, co-founder, explaining, “There were people who were ready to segregate their garbage and dispose it in a responsible manner and then there were biogas plants and recyclers who were in need of high quality material. There was just a disconnect between these two and no one to bring them together on a single platform.”
        Malayil and Pronita Saxena, founder and CEO, realised that citizens and businesses are willing to make changes in the situation but didn’t know how and couldn’t find a working system.
        They have teamed up with several restaurants like Red Fork, Mother Cluckers, The Humming Tree, Hard Rock Cafe, blueFrog, Permit Room and chains like Smokehouse Deli, Social, and others spread across the city’s commercial hubs,​ who wanted to be more sustainable with their waste disposal.
        With Citizengage, the collector comes in every day, can be tracked online, and users can even find out exactly where their waste is ending up. Their in-house trainers go into each restaurant and explain the importance of waste segregation to the chefs, busboys and waiters.
        They have diverted over 1,500 tonnes of waste in the city so far and have also lit up the Domlur BDA park with the energy created. Bengaluru is actually one of the few cities in the country with very progressive segregation laws, which makes their work easier.
        Delhi ​and Mumbai​ are yet to catch up, but the Citizengage team is optimistic about creating policies that enable them to set up shop there too. They believe responsible citizens and businesses are the crux of the system and they are eager to become a tool for them to control what happens to their waste. ​
        “The challenges are many,” adds Malayil. They do not want to take away anyone’s livelihood, but just streamline the process. “I do not wish to comment on the opposition we have faced but our main aim is to create a platform that generates awareness among the public on how garbage is actually a huge resource and offers them a system to take control of the conversion,” he concludes.

        Details: citizengage.co

        — Anagha M

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        Leela Palace
        The hotel brought in some
        early festive cheer with their annual cake mixing event. The fun afternoon also saw guests indulging in festive favourites such as eggnog
        and mulled wine.

        Koramangala Social
        The new Social was launched with pomp
        and show last weekend. DJ Clement took over the turntables. Vocalist Vasu Dixit from the band Swarathma performed some of his much loved tunes. Guests sampled the new menu and sipped on signature cocktails.

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