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    Wearable technology makes its way to the Lakme Fashion Week, courtesy ElektroCoutuCafeElLumiere-2016-32456re.

    THIS year at the Lakmé Fashion Week Summer/Resort 2016 there was a bit of an added buzz. The reason? The participation of Berlin fashion house ElektroCouture & Friends. With people being so dependant on technology, Lisa Lang, founder of the label, feels that there’s no time like now to embrace the untapped world of tech-integrated fashion. “Historically speaking, fashion has always been influenced by technology — right from the sewing machine to zippers and even stretchable fabric, which was originally designed for astronauts,” she begins.
    Featuring a line up of other designers like Lina Wassong, Melissa Coleman and Valeria Lamontagne (who has worked as a consultant with Cirque Du Soleil, and mounted an exhibition at the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics), the collection uses light in ways that make each garment come alive. “Light is positive technology; it serves to lift the spirit of the wearer. But we also need to look at functionality. Earlier, we used to have garments with batteries that need to be changed and wires that need to be replaced. But here, each piece has batteries that are rechargeable, with inbuilt docking stations. Some of our garments also feature sensors that make the fabrics light up based on the sound around the wearer,” shares Lang, who has joined forces with other designers and employed digital knitting and weaving to construct garments with unconventional silhouettes. Expected to be on sale from the second week of April, the designer reveals that their previous collection is already sold out. Apart from dresses, scarves, jackets and tops, the line also includes necklaces and bracelets.
    Subtle stabs at technology in fashion have been made by a host of designers from Alexander Wang and Versace to Marchesa, Karl Lagerfeld and Chanel, who recently showcased their 3D printed collection. “It’s not a question of who, but a question of when,” says Lang. And as far as India is concerned, she feels that it’s the perfect market for wearable tech, adding that one of the dresses from her line is a homage to Mumbai. “It has a netted bodice and the skirt features a picture of the Mumbai skyline, which is lit up.” In terms of keeping it sustainable, she shares that they’re working with engineers to create garments that use solar power and harness energy from movement. “We’re also using laser cutters to make each cut more precise and thereby reduce wastage of fabric,” she signs off
    Rs 7,000  onwards. Details: elektrocouture.com

    —Rashmi Rajagopal

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