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    With a special focus on local cuisine, Farzi Cafe makes its way to the city

    Food8Lead3The Farzi Café has been a phenomenon internationally. Slated to open across a 11,000 sqft space, seating 250 people, with its own microbrewery in Bengaluru soon, there is so much to look forward to. Zorawar Kalra tells us more.

    What do you think of the Bengaluru diner’s palate?
    It is an amazing city from the dining perspective because the people are well-travelled and have a highly sophisticated palate. They are always open to new food experiences. There is also a good food scene online, with people being well acquainted with the nuances of good food, ingredients etc. So that’s why unique restaurants like Farzi Café feel that Bengaluru is a good market.

    What can we expect at the cafe?
    About 25 per cent of the menu is going to be new, with typical food from the region that people have grown up with, being presented in an all-together new form. There will be no compromises on the original taste of the local cuisine, which in this case is Bengaluru. We will also be bringing in tried, tested and well-appreciated specials from each of the Farzis across the world.
    This is also going to be the first Farzi Café in the world to have a microbrewery attached to it. We have hired the best brew master in India to provide us with a list of eight proprietary craft beers for a completely curated experience.

    Tell us about the ambience.
    This is by far the largest of our restaurants, spread across 11,000 sqft. Bengaluru will have a massive space, with a centrally placed bar. There will be a space for live gigs with the best sound systems. We will have a mix of indoor and outdoor patio seating too. We also have a great microbrewery set up. The entire lighting matrix of the restaurant is customised, and took over two months to complete. This restaurant, I believe is going to be our masterpiece.

    Your restaurants have been big on techniques, molecular gastronomy in particular. How are you using such techniques to highlight your food?
    Done right and without the gimmicks, it is a great way to enhance food. Take for example the Raj Kachori with Saunth (Tamarind) ki Chutney — we converted the chutney into a foam and served it alongside. This way, you have the taste and experience of the original dish, but with an enhanced look and just one per cent of the calories. We essentially took a 200-year-old recipe and made it better with science. We are also going to be using a few post-modern techniques like centrifuges, to enhance the experience.

    How open has the global palate become to Indian cuisine in its true essence?
    Having worked on Farzi Café now, I can now confidently say that the time for Indian food has come. We have so far not made a conscious effort to produce high quality restaurants that evolve to showcase our cuisine properly. Farzi Café does that.
    Farzi Cafe is set to launch on June 15. At UB City. Details: farzicafe.com

    — Ruth D’Souza Prabhu

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