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Ratatat will play a fresh set of riffs to the delight of instrumental fans

After a gap of five years, instrumental electronica duo Evan Mast and Mike Stroud released their fifth album this July. And it’s been worth the wait as the album, titled Magnifique, opened to good reviews. So the duo, popularly known as Ratatat, have been touring a lot of late to promote the new and heady guitar riffs. Bengaluru is part of that itinerary too. They will perform at The Humming Tree for a pre-show of the Magnetic Fields Festival to be held in Rajasthan.
The duo is quite excited about their first India visit. Mast, who juggles multiple instruments, while Stroud works on guitars, shares, “I am staying back in India for a week after the gig to travel around a bit. I have heard India is beautiful. Here, we’ll play songs from our albums, Magnifique and Classics. They are easier to perform live, as they’ve got a lot more guitaring.”
Keeping rock music lovers tuned to an instrumental gig is not quite easy. But the live shows of the New York-based duo are known to be a hit. They use laser lights and video montages to create an overwhelming visual experience. Their knack for presentation also reflects on the cover of their new album, which has grabbed a lot of eyeballs. It features a collage of a few famous and mostly imaginary faces.
But what took the album so long, we ask. “We had been working consistently for eight years. We were a little burned out. So Stroud shifted to the outskirts of New York to focus on his domestic life, while I travelled a lot in the meantime.”
The two first met as students at Skidmore College in New York in 2001. Gradually they realised they were both averse to lyrics. “While making music in high school, we would leave lyrics for the end. We didn’t want to share our music if it had lyrics. It got to a point where we decided to make instrumental music,” recollects Mast.
He signs off saying, “Lyrics are a quick way to get attention. So when instrumental music works, it’s immensely rewarding. When people hear it around the world, they don’t have to understand what is being said, they just have to feel the music.”
December 16. At Indiranagar. 9 pm. Tickets (`1,000) on
insider.in
— Barkha Kumari

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