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    An ace photographer and Michelin star chef team up to teach you how to style and capture food like a pro

    If you cannot resist the urge to whip out your camera and start clicking before you tuck into your perfectly-plated dessert, do we have news for you. Award-winning photographer Sharad Haksar and London-based Michelin star chef Alfred Prasad (who is in the city on vacation) are organising a workshop on how to make food look good. And if you sign up for it, you will be supporting a cause, as proceeds from the workshop go towards the flood relief work carried out by Bhoomika Trust. “Facebook is flooded with food pictures and of late, we have noticed that there is some correlation between people who like food also liking photography,” says Haksar, adding that this workshop stemmed from the idea of doing a shoot of a landscape combined with a market visit, cooking and the final product. “We were thinking of a coffee table book,” says Haksar, who is convinced that his next exhibition needs to have a story behind every picture. “Lots of behind the scenes with travel experiences and all. This is the way to go. People want to know how a picture was taken. What the weather was like, etc,” he adds.

    Dilemma of megapixels IMG_2419
    While Haksar shoots with a professional Phase One camera, he insists that there’s really no need to spend on expensive equipment, if you know how to take good pictures. “Any camera that’s 10 megapixels or above can give you large images,” he says, adding, “I have even used a Gionee camera phone to take professional pictures during my shoot in Japan.” Any DSLR or an iPhone are more than sufficient for food photography, Haksar assures.

    The coffee table book will materialise soon enough we’re sure, for now we quiz Haksar about the workshop and this is what he says. “Prasad will make about three to four dishes and show you how to plate and style them to make them interesting. Some dishes have a lot of texture and some don’t. We’ll talk about different textures and the suitable lighting for each,” he says. So does this mean that participants will be learning the nitty-gritties of working with flashes and setting up lights? “I don’t use a flash. I’ve never bought one in my life,” is Haksar’s reply. “We will tech participants to work with available light at home and in restaurants,” he says, adding that a few techniques like using tracing paper will also be taught. Post the workshop, participants will be given an exercise to evaluate what they have learnt, and the good news is that you don’t have to bring a camera along. “We will provide the equipment for the exercise,” he says.

    Tomorrow, from 10 am to 3 pm at GRT Convention Centre. Rs. 4,580 per person (inclusive of lunch). Details: sharad@sharadhaksar.com, 9841141311

    -Ryan Peppin

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