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    With 14 bands offering everything from fusion to parody, this festival promises to unite headbangers

    After two successful editions, Amaranta Entertainment is back with The Music Festival. Bringing together young and popular bands, the Chennai-based owner of the company, Geoffrey G Thomas, says, “Our aim is to promote original music. With new bands emerging every once in a while, festivals like these provide them a platform to get noticed.” While some bands like Indus Creed and Agam adhere to classic rock, others like Mad Ornage Fireworks and Lagori play a mix. “Rock gives more life to music and with it as a backing, we can incorporate any style of music,” says Govind Menon, Thaikkudam Bridge’s vocalist.
    August 1 to 14, from 5.30 pm, at multiple venues. `400 onwards. Details:in.bookmyshow.com

    Enna Da Rascalas
    Known for their parodies, these stand-ups are getting a chance to let loose. “It is intimidating to be put up among these great bands,” says Yohan Chacko, a member, adding, “We’ll find a common thread to connect our songs and provide comic relief in the madness.” At Museum Theatre, August 9.

    Motherjane
    Having started out at college rock competitions, Motherjane has been around for almost two decades. As one of the oldest and most successful bands in Kerala, they have kept their music fresh by constantly evolving. “In our new songs, we have mellowed down the ethnic element and used more electronic sounds,” says drummer John Thomas. Calling themselves a progressive ethnic rock band, they were one of the first to fuse rock with influences from India’s vast soundscape. Thomas feels rock attracts more people as it creates a larger-than-life image. Besides playing revamped versions of their old songs, the band will also perform recent hits like Clayplay. At Museum Theatre on August 1.

    Indus Creed
    After their album, Thief, became a huge hit last year, the five-member band (one of the oldest in the country) is back to perform old tunes and new. Vocalist-guitarist Uday Benegal says, “Though we are a rock band, our music has changed over the years. With the addition of newbies Jai Row Kavi and Krishna Jhaveri, we’ve brought in a new barrel of new influences.” While they might not repeat Rock and Roll Renegade and Pretty Child—their most popular songs—Benegal feels, “More than rock music, I think it is independent music that is evolving in India. There will be more bands and they will just get bigger and better.” August 1, at SMVR Concert Hall.

    Masala Coffee
    Like their name, this band aims to combine different genres to create soulful music. “We have been producing music in folk, funk and Indian classical, as we like to experiment,” says Varun Sunil, the band’s percussionist and vocalist. As one of the youngest bands in the country, they also incorporate rock into their repertoire. “Fusion is in and we enjoy doing it. With the fusion of rock and Rajasthani folk, we’ve created several songs, like our popular Once Upon a Time in Punjab,” he says, adding that every genre has its own beauty. At the festival, expect original compositions that fuse various genres. At SMVR Concert Hall, on August 1.

    Mayuri J Ravi

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