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    Bombay Black comes to the city for the first time

    Bombay Black, one of the earliest gems of underground music in India, will perform at blueFrog this Sunday. And this will be their first gig in Bengaluru, since the time they first hit the indie scene in 1999. The Mumbai-based outfit was one of the first Indian bands to be invited to play abroad (Inland Invasion Festival, LA in 2001, where they opened for rock ‘n’ roll band, Aerosmith). Having parted ways in 2003 (to pursue separate careers), they reunited last February.
    Guitarist Paresh Kamath was as shocked as we were at the realisation that this will be their first gig in the city. He says, “We’ve played in Mumbai, Pune, Delhi, and many other places, but never here. We are quite thrilled about finally making our way here.” Quite naturally, the preparations are special. He adds, “This set has almost nothing from our older albums. It’s new, with different sounds and vibes. In fact, when we compare our older and new er works, we sound like two different bands. But, we were 20-somethings back then. We will also play tracks from our latest album, Snow White And The Seven Bungalows.”
    The band held their reunion gig at TAP restobar in Mumbai last year, and Kamath tells us that they went in without a set list and received a lot of positive feedback. “We were simply jamming and it felt good. We got an overwhelming response from the audience. Some had heard us back in the 90s, some only knew our names, others were just curious about who we were,” he tells us.
    They plan to release another album soon (five songs are ready to be recorded), but it depends on when the members (a rotating line-up of six to eight musicians) get together to hit the studio again. That’s because each one has other musical commitments. Kamath, his bassist brother Naresh, and drummer Kurt Peters perform for folk rock project, Kailasa, guitarist Randolph Correia runs indie rock act, Shaa’ir + Func, and Samrat B has an electronica band, Teddy Boy Kill. Drummer Lindsay D’Mello has been part of collectives from Midival Punditz to Dark Circle Factory.
    “We are not putting too much pressure on each other to come together for gigs, festivals, or create songs that top the charts. We are just enjoying our time together as Bombay Black again,” says Kamath, adding, “Our music has evolved. It’s a denser mix of jazz, funk and hip hop now. It’s original, coming out of our own creativity, rather than influences. I will credit this to our different experiences in life, now that we are in our 40s (laughs).”

    August 7. Entry `300. At Church Street. 9-11.30 pm. Details: 69999549

    — Barkha Kumari

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