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    Gardens, festivals, origami cranes and more take centrestage in Safomasi’s latest homeware collection

    Safomasi-ProfileLaUnched in 2012, this homeware brand won the Elle Deco International Design Award a year later, for their camel traders print (inspired by Rajasthan’s Pushkar Camel Fair) in the bedroom category. Safomasi, by Sarah Fotheringham and Maninder Singh, has recently launched its latest collection called Kawaii, inspired by Fotheringham’s four-month stay in Japan. In the past, they have offered three collections inspired by their different experiences of India — like Kerala’s romance town, Allepey, to the colourful and quirky Mithai collection which documents the varieties of sweets found in India.
    Flavours of Japan
    With Japanese manicured gardens, Maneki-neko (lucky cats) and eccentrically-styled poodles, Japan’s vibrant culture and lifestyle finds its place in Safomasi’s quilts, cushions, tea towels and pouches this season. Their napkin sets featuring origami cranes, based on the Japanese belief that a 1,000 cranes bring good luck, make for an interesting find. “From illustrating the famous Shibuya crossing, which is one of the busiest intersections in Japan, to attending a wrestling match and etching Sumos on tea towels, Sarah has done it all,” says Singh, who’d met Fotheringham at a photo shoot in Delhi after returning from Melbourne in 2010. Given Fotheringham’s background of an artist and illustrator, and Singh’s experience as an event manager at the Fashion Design Council of India for three years, their collaboration covers both the design and marketing aspects.
    The back story
    With a focus on home grown and natural, their products are 100 percent cotton, all hand screen printed with azo-free dyes by artisans from Delhi and other parts of India, while the woollen pom-poms attached to the corners of the cushions are made by Singh’s grandmother and a team of women back in his hometown in Panipat. “We are also sourcing fabrics from an NGO called Impulse which helps a lot of artisans in the North East, especially Arunachal Pradesh,” informs Singh. Although the couple retail from their website, they have stockists in Australia, Germany, England and US too, apart from Bombay Electric in Mumbai and MaalGaadi in the city. With plans of turning their office space in Delhi into a brick and mortar store and offering customising services as well, Fotheringham wants do a collection based on England as she has lots of memories associated with the country. Priced from Rs.1,200 to Rs.9,200. Details: safomasi.com

    —Sharmistha Maji

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