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From patchwork denims to elaborate sleeves, here are the biggest trends from LFW’s Summer Resort 17 edition

Seamless. That was the buzzword at the 17th edition of Lakme Fashion Week (LFW). While the five-day event saw the return of acclaimed
couturiers like Delhi’s Falguni Shane Peacock and Goa-based Savio Jon after a long break, the regulars at the gala (like Gaurang Shah) delivered surprises by being experimental with everything from sustainable fabrics to androgynous fits. Here’s our trend report

Pleat perfect
Anti-fit will continue to be a hot trend we’re told. But Divya Reddy’s eco-friendly collection titled Shahibzadi says otherwise. Accentuated with pleated detailing in her tiered lehengas and gowns, this konda patti (wild mountain cotton) ensemble, is a feminine yet edgy take on Indo-Western styles. The showstopper outfit donned by actor Malaika Arora featured a red bralette paired with a yellow tiered and pleated lehenga epitomising Divya’s design philosophy. The trend also figures as box pleats in Raamz’s Geo-Metron collection.

Sleeve a mark
Sonam and Paras Modi’s lehenga-intense ensemble in silks and satins showcased a shimmery colour palette. “We wanted to bring a summery yet breezy touch to the
designs. Hence the use of flowy capes embellished with zardosi and pita work on the sleeves,” shares the Mumbai-based designer duo. A contemporary take on the same, paired with Indo-Western silhouettes was also observed in Pondicherry-based Naushad Ali’s designs.

The ivory edit
The ivory edit Summer/Resort collections are generally associated with a burst of colours. Even more so when it’s done by Hyderabad’s revivalist couturier Gaurang Shah. But Muslin—a breezy ensemble of floor-length kurtas, anarkalis and saris rendered in sheer whites and ivories—is a departure from Gaurang’s signature style in terms of colour. The line features traditional weaves like paithani, jamdani and gold zaris, and highlights fabrics including khadi, Kota silk and organza. Rajasthan based label Kotwara too used this colour scheme in their collection

Second chances
One can always count on Amit Aggarwal to come up with something eclectic. His line Junk Spunk showcased a range of discarded materials. This included bindi sheets, poly bags with gamchas, sequin waste, block-printed fabrics and ripped patan patola saris. Whimsical in nature, the designs featured flared capes, multitextured minis and drop-waist dresses. While vibrant hues dominated (think wine red, olive and ink blue), belts formed an integral part of the silhouettes.

Playing patch up
Rajesh Pratap Singh’s collection redefined the concept of menswear at the Sustainable Man segment. With a line crafted out of discarded khadi and old denim, Rajesh brought a contemporary touch to his pieces through the clever use of polka dot stoles. These stoles were paired with knee-length jackets. The jackets were made with patches of old denim. The threads used to sew them together, visible to the naked eye, made an interesting addition to his design language.

Silver shadows
This season’s cocktail outfits have all been about Swarovski crystals, but designer Payal Singhal is bucking the trend. Her retro-chic designs under the Summer Resort line titled Lady M—inspired by high society glam trends from the late-1930s—are accentuated with silvery mukaish and pita detailing. Commenting on the same, Payal predicts, “Metallic shades are going to be huge in 2017, while the hues used may vary between silver, gold, bronze and rose gold.” Translating her forecast into accessories, designer Gaury Pathare’s Wandering Whites presented an ensemble of upcycled brass jewellery in bronze tones.

Easy does it
Think butterfly motifs, breezy linen from the brand Burgoyne and soft tailoring techniques coming together. At The Millennials presented by Narendra Kumar, playful colours were incorporated into an assortment of single and double-breasted jackets. Paired with a range of looks including jogger pants and sporty shorts, his collections occupy a niche between athleisure and formal fits with a touch of quirk. Delhi-based Pero also experimented with the fabric resulting in a range of jackets contrasting feather light linen gauze balanced against heavy linen stripes.

—Arya P Dinesh

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