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    Class up your  home with South Indian and art deco antiques from The Amara Store

    Located on a quiet lane, just off the busy stretch that is Koramangala’s 80 feet road, The Amara Store is an unassuming space boasting a finely curated collection of period furniture, antiques and home decor. An extension of duo Chitra Paradkar and Raji Narayan’s passion, the spacious new store is devoid of clutter with all its contents neatly displayed. “The idea is to collect and not hoard, so our store is very orderly but not boring,” explains Paradkar, as she takes us around the space.1004BuyLead4

    “We met when we were both involved with Dwaraka, the kalamkari collective — I as a designer and she in the administrative wing. We hit it off immediately and now, here we are,” says Paradkar, about how it all started.   The duo focuses on South Indian antiques, but art deco pieces also find space in their collection. The articles are all sourced from their travels, to places like Chettinad, Kerala, Andhra visit remote towns and small pockets, on the advice of our dealers,” she shares. They work closely with two dealers, who are also the sources for their personal collections, so you can rest assured about the authenticity of their products.

    Number crunching
    As soon as you enter the shop, you are greeted by a large chest of drawers, which Paradkar tells us was used by the Indian railways. The iron bound, teak chest comes with 1,400 copper rivets and dates back to the 1930s. Prominently displayed on one pillar is a piece of intricately carved head gear used in the traditional theyyam dance of Northern Malabar. Crafted from jack wood, the elaborate work of art is from the late 1800s. “Theyyam is a form of dance where the dancer is possessed by the spirit of the Gods and people come to the dancer to help solve their problems,” explains Paradkar.
    We also spotted some brass bootha masks from South Canara that go back to the 1850s, apart from a first edition Ravi Verma oliograph depicting Radha waiting for Krishna to arrive. “The expression and feeling of Radha is so well captured in this piece,” she enthuses. The store also stocks a decent collection of Mysore paintings, apart from a World War II torch, and a Hitchcock lamp, with an interesting gear mechanism that makes it soot proof. Also keep an eye out for an impressive selection of cushions, cushion covers, lamps and statement vases for a modern touch.
    `500 upwards. At 1st Block, Koramangala. Details: 40973747

    —Rashmi Rajagopal

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